Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Surviving the Entire Term

Vasu Reddy From Chicago
vasureddy@aol.com

When elected for an office the politicians typically focus on serving for a full term of the office, and when reelections are on the radar, they start preparing for contesting the elections again.  Typically incumbents present their accomplishments and their party’s accomplishments in the term they are serving and seek reelection for the next term.  Democracies allow for candidates to present and support their political party’s agendas, and if popular and acceptable to the public they will continue to be in the office for their full term, and if the administration is successful in meeting the needs of the electorate they get reelected.
 
In running a government with a group of coalition of parties, the dynamics of the ruling party get prioritized primarily with satisfying the demands of the coalition partners, rather than having a singular agenda for the national interest.  The coalition partners typically keeps shifting the demands it has for the leader of the coalition and the differences of objectives of each of the partners clash with each other, conflicting with the agenda of the leader of the coalition.  The demands on available resources and funding programs that are of importance to the individual partners of the coalition often conflict with each other, and put pressure on the governance.  There is the pressure of keeping the coalition together first as the government needs to survive the majority rules requirement, and then the continued demands of each of the partners to meet their own constituents needs.  With many promises made to each of the constituents, and the meager resources available to meet the demands of the nation, above all the planned incoming resources verses expenditures; all place a great demand on governing the nation.
 
The current government continues to survive on a regular basis despite the appearing and disappearing of coalition partners, and massive scams that involve national integrity and resources.  Along with changes to the cabinet which continues to evolve along with the changes to the coalition partners, it has been hard for the government to keep governing with the slew of scams.  The survival of the government has taken front seat, rather than the public agenda.
 
While the term of the current government is coming to a close, it continues to be precarious and partners ever more demanding.  The pressure of keeping the power outweighs the governance issues, and has affected the national to no end.  There is no end to the issues that are internal to the political party, and there is no sure shot way of setting goals that keep the people first.  The only mantra has been to be in power irrespective of the issues that face the citizens, and continue to make relationships to keep the term going.  There is no hope that the next government will have absolute majority to be in power for a full term without the threat of coalition partners ditching the governing and deliver to an agenda that is promised prior to the elections.

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